Interviewing Tips

How to Answer “What Is Your Greatest Weakness?”   In an interview, talking about your weaknesses and flaws is difficult. We’re here to make it easier. One of the most common and aggravating interview questions of them all: What is your greatest weakness? Are you rolling your eyes? Most candidates hate this question and consider it pointless. After all, they aren’t about to confess candidly to their biggest flaws in the middle of a job interview. However, this question has become a cliché for a reason. Interviewers continue to ask it even though they know they are unlikely to get answers that are 100% honest. Why? Because the way you answer a question about your weaknesses is very telling. You may not even realize what you are communicating when you answer this question. And let’s face it, you’re probably doing it wrong. Most people do. I say that as an interview coach who has now worked with thousands...

A Rational Way to Make a Gut Decision - Interviewing & Pre-Screening Candidates With the objective of increasing interview pre-screening and pre-qualifying candidate assessment accuracy, here are some tips for that both interviewers and candidates can use. How to Separate Fact from Fiction and Ensure an Accurate Interview Assessment   Just the facts. Too many candidates speak in generalities. These have no value. Facts do. So if you’re a candidate you need to be prepared to give specific details about each of your major accomplishments. These include dates, measurable results, the actual deliverables, and any supporting information needed to validate the accomplishments. If you're the interviewer, you need to dig for this information. Don’t leave it up to the candidate to provide it. Give and get SMARTe examples to prove a strength. Candidates need to prove every strength with specific examples. Interviewers need to ask for these examples. We suggest using the SMARTe acronym...

When interviewing for a decision-making position, the right preparation is indispensable. Usually, you will need to provide more in-depth answers than for management or director-level opportunities. One of the most valued qualities that employers look for is a candidate’s aptitude to establish a strategic perspective, closely shadowed by his or her business acumen, and a comprehensive viewpoint. Make sure you offer sufficient confirmation that you can bring all of this and more to the table during a C-level interview. Frequently senior executives under perform in interviews by overstating their career history and development, rather than concentrating on the influence they have had on organizations and the lessons that they have learned. To deliver your worth as a potential leader, communicate your management style, organizational vision, principles, and ethics. It is important to stress the “soft” skills, counting your emotional intelligence and leadership style. Be prepared to dig deep into your capabilities –...

        How to Answer Tricky Interview Questions Does the thought of going on a job interview cause your palms to sweat and your body to break out in hives? Stop itching; you're not alone.  The vast majority of job seekers admit to emotions ranging from mild uneasiness to downright panic leading up to their interviews. The good news is there have been no reported cases of job seekers who died of nervousness during a job interview. So relax and follow these simple tips for keeping your anxiety at bay before and during your interview. First, take the proper amount of time to prepare for your interview. Being well-prepared will boost your confidence and lower your anxiety. Experts recommend that you spend at least three hours preparing for each interview.  You should draft answers to the most common interview questions and practice speaking them out loud. You also should read up on the...

Your resume is stellar, and you've written what has to be the best cover letter ever. You’re ecstatic—but not surprised—when the phone rings and you’re asked to come in for an interview. And while this step of the process is no cake walk, you've practiced your elevator pitch, gone through the hard questions, and checked off your interview prep check-list, and you think you’re ready. But not so fast. After checking all of those big things off your list, it’s important to think about the little ones. Truth is, interviewers pay attention to everything from the words you say to the shoes on your feet, and the tiniest of details could take you out of the running, without you even realizing it. Obviously, you can never know exactly what little things your interviewer will notice or care about, but there are a few “big” little things that you can easily address to help your...